Rough Guide to the Material Editor – Color and Alpha Tab – Part 3

In this third part of the the rough guide to the material editor, we will be exploring the Color and Alpha Tab of the advanced material editor

Part 4 will jump into the function editor for a preview of some of the cool stuff that can be done in there. Filters will also be covered there.

There will be a reference guide to the shapes of the noise functions in Part 4.

Firstly we will look at the Advanced Material Editor Color and Alpha Tab. Unless stated, all mapping is as “object parametric”.

Continue reading “Rough Guide to the Material Editor – Color and Alpha Tab – Part 3”

Vue 7 Water Editor – Guide Part 2

Firstly, thank you for your comments both in the forums and here, the are most pleasing and make the time spent worth while.

Foam will be explored in todays edition in the same manner as the other settings yesterday.

Global Wave control must be disabled before these settings can be changed.

Continue reading “Vue 7 Water Editor – Guide Part 2”

Vue 7 Water Editor – Guide Part 1

Since the water editor posts of this blog is proving to be the most popular, I have decided to expand upon it over the next couple of days with some short guides, mostly renders of the water and the settings that they took to create them. Todays post will be extremes, i.e. settings as they are originally set as a control followed by one setting turned up to the max so that the effect can be seen clearly.

Firstly a few things that should be noted, the water editor can only be used with an infinite plane of water and it is populated with a meta water, it is opened simply by double clicking on the water surface or by right clicking on the water plane in the layer menu and selecting edit.

The following menu is displayed (assuming you have “default water” selected as the texture)


This gives the following result. Please note that all renders are done with the “default” atmosphere for clarity.


Not particularly exciting, so lets have a look at those settings in a bit more detail.

Surface Altitude:
Surface altitude affects the Actual Height of the sea surface above the 0 X,Z co-ordinate, for example, if it is set to 100, it is well above the ground plane, where as if you have it at 0 it will be resting on the ground plane.

Set to 0 Above

Set to 100 Above, Notice the position of the water element.

Displaced Water Surface:
This option creates a more realistic surface to the water by producing heights for the water and physically changing the shape of the object, This looks more realistic than with just textured surfaces because it allows surfaces to show shadows and gives extra depth. This is the same as adding displacement to, for example, a brick wall.

Bruno Memain pointed out that displaced water surface doesn’t use displacement. It transforms the water plane (2 polys) into an infinite procedural terrain (more than 2 polys …) This procedural terrain uses a set of nodes based on the “open ocean” fractal node we know since Vue5. So it isn’t as resources heavy as displacement, and since it is a procedural terrain, the closer you are from the surface, the more detail you can see.

Examples below are of firstly non-displaced material and secondly displaced material, with the Overall Agitation cranked up to 100.





It should be noted that displacement takes longer to render and vastly increases the number of polygons in the scene, in the second picture there are 7100000 polygons while in the first there are only 4.

Use Global Wave Control:

This is a setting which allows you to change the settings generically without going into editing the settings individually. In this section, all images will be duplicate, firstly with displacement active and secondly without displacement.

When this setting is active, the overall agitation option is useable, however when you turn the global wave control off, the Overall Agitation option is greyed, and the other advanced options are availiable.

Overall Agitation:
This is an option that uses preset settings to control the overall appearance of the water surface. Below are examples of the overall agitation at setting 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%

0% With Displacement 2 Polygons

0% No Displacement 2 Polygons

25% With Displacement 2140000 Polygons

25% No Displacement 2 Polygons

50% With Displacement 2560000 Polygons

50% No Displacement 2 Polygons

75% With Displacement 3350000 Polygons

75% No Displacement 2 Polygons

100% With Displacement 7100000 Polygons

100% No Displacement 2 Polygons

Wind Direction:
Wind direction depicts the direction in which the waves will move towards as in nature, the example below is waves moving at 45 degrees and then also at 90 degrees. (Overall Agitation is set to 50% in both images, Displacement is on)

Wind Direction 45 degrees,

Wind Direction 90 degrees,

You can see that the direction of the waves has altered, This is probably best used when creating shorelines and objects with waves moving towards them.

The following settings can only be used with the “Global Wave Control” deactivated

Wave Amount:
Wave amount depictes the quantity of waves that are present in the water plane, default is set at 1. Images below are firstly with displacement and then without, the settings are 0, 1, 5, 10.

0 No Displacement

0 With Displacement

1 No Displacement

1 With Displacement

5 No Displacement

5 With Displacement

10 No Displacement

10 With Displacement

This depicts the height of the displacement that is enforced on the waves, thus the displacement option must be active. The default value is 1, minimum is 0, the maximum is 100. Below are 6 pictures, set at 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100

Height at 0: 0 Polygons

Height at 20: 2530000 Polygons

Height at 40: 3000000 Polygons

Height at 60: 3200000 Polygons

Height at 80: 3400000 Polygons

Height at 100: 3400000 Polygons

Height at 0 appears to cancel out the water altogether, which makes sense really as water can’t have 0 height.

Wind Intensity:
Wind intensity appears to dictate the amount of lashing that the waves take, i.e. how much foam is present on top and how agitated the surface of the water is.

The default value is 1. The following pictures use the values 0, 1 and 2. Non displacement mapping is first, followed by displacement.

0 – No displacement: 2 Polygons

0 – With displacement: 2443000 Polygons

1 – No displacement: 2 Polygons

1 – With displacement: 3000000 Polygons

2 – No displacement: 2 Polygons

2 – With displacement: 3600000 Polygons

Agitation dictates how much swell, and current the water has, or.. how agitated the water is…

The minimum value is 0.5, the maximum is 2.0, The images below show this set on 0.5, 1 and 2. Without Displacement is shown first, with displacement is shown second.

0.5 No Displacement 2 Polygons

0.5 With Displacement 2 Polygons

1.0 No Displacement 2 Polygons

1.0 With Displacement 2 Polygons

2.0 No Displacement 2 Polygons

2.0 With Displacement 2443000 Polygons

Choppiness dicates how choppy the water is, fairly self explanatory really. Choppiness is the number of small waves that appear in the water in fashion similar to ^^^
so greater choppiness means the waves will be closer together, i.e. ^^^^^ lesser settings will result in ^ ^ ^ and so on..

Default setting is 0.5, minimum is 0, maximum is 1. Below are images of 0, 0.5 and 1, no displacement comes first, displacement comes second.

0 No displacement

0 With displacement

0.5 No displacement

0.5 With displacement

1 No displacement

1 With displacement

The images that use displacement that appear blank are due to the lack of height, this part of a the guide however is to illustrate what each of the options do from a default metawater layer.

Part Two – Making Foam

Hope this helps, suggestions, comments or includes more than welcome.